5 Holiday Hosting Disasters and How to Avoid Them

By: Don Johnson

Published: November 19, 2012

Many hosting nightmares can end your holiday party before it even begins. Thankfully, some of the most damaging mishaps easily can be avoided. We collected five of the most prevalent issues and give you preventative tips to keep your holiday party on track.

Problem: The oven doesn’t heat

For any holiday occasion, the oven is the most important appliance in your house. If it fails to work, the centerpiece of your meal could go from roasted beef, ham, duck, or Tofurky to Peking Duck from the local Chinese takeout joint.

How to avoid:

There are any number of reasons a stove can break, but one common cause of disaster is easy to prevent. Don’t self-clean your oven until AFTER the holidays. You risk blowing a fuse or a thermostat, and tracking down an oven technician around the holidays can be tough.

Problem: The kitchen sink clogs

The day after Thanksgiving is the busiest of the year for plumbers. The prime cause of this clog-a-thon is the mistreatment of drains when cooking holiday feasts. We hope your Thanksgiving went well, and that you avoid clog-a-thons for the rest of the holidays.

How to avoid:

Fats and cooking oils can solidify in your pipes, so never dispose of them in your kitchen sink.

If you have a garbage disposal, make sure it’s running before anything goes in it, and never feed it any stringy, fibrous, or starchy foods like poultry skins or potato peels.

To fix, don’t rely on chemical drain-clearing products that can harm your pipes. Use a snake instead, available for $15 at your local hardware store. Best to keep one on hand.

Problem: The heat goes out

As the party’s host, you’re supposed to hang guests’ coats—not apologize to them for having to keep them on. A lack of heat can stop a holiday party dead in its tracks.

How to avoid:

The key to avoiding freezing your party to a standstill is regular maintenance of your HVAC. Every 90 days, a new one-inch pleated furnace filter should be installed. If you haven’t done it in a while, now’s a good time to replace it.

Also inspect insulation on refrigerant lines that are leading into your house. Replace them if they’re missing or damaged.

Problem: The toilet stops up

Toilets have a way of clogging up at the worst times, such as during parties and when you have overnight guests. This is especially true if you have a low-flow toilet from the early 1990s.

How to avoid:

Don’t flush anything other than sewage and toilet paper down the toilet. And there’s nothing wrong with putting up a polite note to remind your guests to do the same.

Problem: The fridge doesn’t cool

Without a properly functioning refrigerator, your meat could get contaminated, your dairy-based treats could go sour, and you may not be able to save your yummy leftovers. To avoid discovering a warm fridge after it’s too late, take these simple precautions.

How to avoid:

Get a thermometer for your refrigerator to make sure each shelf stays below 40 degrees and you can be aware of any temperature changes.

Also make sure the condenser coils located on the back of the unit or beneath it are free to breathe. Coils blocked from circulating air by cereal boxes atop the fridge, or dirtied by dust or pet hair can prevent a fridge from keeping cool.

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If you have questions about how best to compete in the current market, please contact me today.

Don Johnson, a Licensed Broker with the California Department of Real Estate, is the owner of Don Johnson Realty Group DRE#01398835, a resale real estate brokerage located in Murrieta, California. We specialize in short sales, rental properties, foreclosures and mortgage lending. If you would like to obtain more information, please contact Don at findyouahome@msn.com or call 714-856-3992. http://www.djrealtygroup.com

Low Housing Inventory Means Buyers Must Be Smart When Making Offers

In areas all over the country, the supply of available homes for sale is down… way down in many areas. It’s down about 50% here in parts of California. That means fewer homes for buyers to buy, and fewer buyers to actually get their offers accepted.

It’s like 2002 – 2005 all over again, which means very few homes on the market and LOTS of buyers. That means multiple offers are received on most homes, even the fixers. The net result is that many buyers are frustrated with the market because, of course, only ONE buyer “wins” on each house.

It’s interesting, though, because even though Realtors counsel their buyers about this market (low inventory and multiple offers on each property), buyers often “don’t get it” and still want to write low-ball offers. The market is changing, again, and that means buyers have to be “smart”, along with their agents, and write good offers that will get accepted. So, what does that all mean? Read on.

While I strongly recommend buyers work closely with their Realtors in this area, here are some basic guidelines when submitting offers in the current market:

1. Listen to your Realtor. Realtors work the market every day. They know the market. They know what works and what doesn’t.

2. Don’t think you can low-ball the seller and win the property. While this works occasionally, it’s working less and less in today’s competitive marketplace… even with fixer-uppers. Offer a reasonable price. In our current competitive market, it’s not uncommon for properties to sell for ABOVE the list price. I’ve seen properties with 20+ offers, so you can imagine, many of those offers end up well-above list price. Work with your agent to determine a “smart” price, since too high an offer can hurt you, too (because of appraisal – ask your agent to explain this).

3. Don’t ask for “everything”. There are many different items on a contract that are negotiable and paid by either seller or buyer. Sellers like it when buyers pick up many of the “additional costs” that accompany the selling process. The more that buyers offer to pay for, the more attractive those offers are to sellers.

4. Get pre-approved by a lender… and not just pre-qualified. The more “solid” the buyer looks in the seller’s eyes, the better the offer.

5. Put down a larger deposit. This shows the seller the buyer is more serious. Ask your agent what a good deposit is in your market.

6. Listen to your Realtor. No, writing this a second time was not a mistake. I write it again because it’s important to listen to your agent and take his/her advice when writing an offer. They have a vested interest in ensuring you get the property, so listen to their advice.

If you have questions about how best to compete in the current market, please contact me today.

Don Johnson, a Licensed Broker with the California Department of Real Estate, is the owner of Don Johnson Realty Group DRE#01398835, a resale real estate brokerage located in Murrieta, California. We specialize in short sales, rental properties, foreclosures and mortgage lending. If you would like to obtain more information, please contact Don at findyouahome@msn.com or call 714-856-3992. http://www.djrealtygroup.com

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